Christopher Cornwell, front, Randy Moore, back, and Brock Smith listen as Ruina Senkovich, a Master Gardener and tree steward, talks about trees: their kinds, purpose and even hazards they can present. -- Stephen H. Cowles | Tidewater News
Christopher Cornwell, front, Randy Moore, back, and Brock Smith listen as Ruina Senkovich, a Master Gardener and tree steward, talks about trees: their kinds, purpose and even hazards they can present. -- Stephen H. Cowles | Tidewater News

Archived Story

Every day is Earth Day

Published 11:32am Saturday, June 22, 2013

COURTLAND—Ten children in the Junior Master Gardening Camp on Friday finished their studies with a visit to the home of Doug Dundalow and Randy Moore in Courtland. There, the boys and girls along with Western Tidewater Master Gardeners got to see firsthand how people are able to cultivate, preserve and recycle the environment.

In front, left, Christopher Cornwell, Devin Fisher, Shaundra Sturdifen, Brianna Perez, Aleigha Perez, Madison Broadbent; back, Brock Smith, Daniel Rawles, Matteo Smith and Spencer Fillhart visited the home of David Dundalow and Randy Moore in Courtland to learn about nature from Master Gardeners. -- Stephen H. Cowles | Tidewater News
In front, left, Christopher Cornwell, Devin Fisher, Shaundra Sturdifen, Brianna Perez, Aleigha Perez, Madison Broadbent; back, Brock Smith, Daniel Rawles, Matteo Smith and Spencer Fillhart visited the home of David Dundalow and Randy Moore in Courtland to learn about nature from Master Gardeners. — Stephen H. Cowles | Tidewater News

The weeklong camp, titled “Making Every Day an Earth Day,” is part of the Regional Workforce Development Center’s Kids College.

Cooking, fishing, learning crafts and history are but a few of the many activities offered to children this season.

Dundalow and Moore took turns with the chaperones in guiding the rising second- through fifth-graders around the extensive property. They saw not only peacocks, turkeys and other birds wandering about, but also saw how the men have taken found objects and reused them for practical purposes. For example, Rachel Chiepps of Isle of Wight Economic Development pointed out how glass windows have been made into a greenhouse.

Master Gardener Ruina Senkovich, who’s also a tree steward, explained the importance trees have in daily lives, such as providing oxygen, but also how they can be potential hazards.

The gardens, water sources and beehives were also part of the tour, which were among the highlights for the Master Gardeners of tomorrow.

Aleigha Perez said she liked the peacocks the best. Madison Broadbent said she enjoyed the playground, and Devin Fisher said he particularly liked the nature trail and gardens.

To learn more about other Kids College courses, contact Teri Zurfluh, Kids College director, at kidscollege@pdc.edu or contact the Workforce Development Office at 569-6700. You may also visit www.pdc.edu/workforce-development/kids-college to see the catalog.

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