Archived Story

Girl Scouts to host march for remembering Dr. King

Published 11:17am Friday, January 17, 2014

ALEX KOKICH/INTERN
alex.kokich@tidewaternews.com

Raven Powell, Brionna Reid, Indiya Reid, Breana Whitfield, Amani Gary, Diamond Warren, Janay Sweat of Boykins Girl Scouts No. 5073 and leader Kisha Watford at last year’s celebration of Martin Luther King Jr.’s life and legacy. -- FILE PHOTO
Raven Powell, Brionna Reid, Indiya Reid, Breana Whitfield, Amani Gary, Diamond Warren, Janay Sweat of Boykins Girl Scouts No. 5073 and leader Kisha Watford at last year’s celebration of Martin Luther King Jr.’s life and legacy. — FILE PHOTO

FRANKLIN—To commemorate the life and legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., area Girl Scouts will host a morning exercise in remembering.

“We walk to remember Dr. King’s fight for equality,” said Kisha Watford, “and to fulfill the dream that he had.”

Watford is the leader of Boykins Girl Scouts Group No. 5073, which will have its fourth annual Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial and Unity March to “Keep UNITY in the CommUNITY.” This takes place Monday, Jan. 20, at 8:45 a.m. The event is free, and will be at the Paul D. Camp Community College parking lot.

Participants are also being encouraged to gather in the Regional Workforce Development Center for the message and for the entertainment provided by the praise dancers of the First Baptist Church.

The march was created to educate and unify the community, and to give the Girl Scouts an opportunity to use their skills in a real-word scenario. Partnering with Group No. 5073 are the Paul D. Camp Community College Office of Student Activities, Cover 3 Foundation, the Rev. Dwight Riddick and the First Baptist Church Family, and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc.

Greg Scott, founder of Cover 3 Foundations and former a NFL Player for the Washington Redskins and Cincinnati Bengals, will lead the march and bring the message for the event.

“I’ll be talking to kids about Martin Luther King and about what he means to our society,” said Scott. “He was a pillar in our history and our civilization as African-Americans.

It all started with several people, not just him, but it’s important that we celebrate him and what he represents.”

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