Archived Story

Supervisors challenge hunting bill

Published 12:05pm Saturday, February 1, 2014

COURTLAND—A majority on the Southampton Board of Supervisors is sending a message to people who want to hunt more freely on Sundays: give it a rest.

Should Sunday hunting be allowed in Southampton County?

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During late matters brought up at Monday’s meeting, a resolution was passed 5-2 that the county “opposes hunting in any form on Sunday beyond what is currently authorized, and hereby urges members of the Virginia General Assembly and members of the Board of Directors of the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries to oppose any additional laws or regulations that would authorize expanded hunting on Sunday.”

The resolution was done in response to House Bill 1237, which passed 71-27 on Tuesday in the Virginia General Assembly. On Friday, the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources passed an identical version, Senate Bill 154, with a vote of 9-4. The matter goes next to the Senate.

Both bills aim to amend Code of Virginia 29.1-521 in regard to hunting wild animals or birds on private property of state waters on Sundays.

As noted in the supervisors’ agenda packet, “Among other things, the bill makes provision for Sunday hunting for any landowner or member of his family or any person with written permission from the landowner, except within 200 yards of a place of worship or any accessory structure thereof.”

Vice Chairman Ronnie West, who made the motion, was joined by Chairman Dallas Jones and supervisors Dr. Alan Edwards, Bruce Phillips and Glenn Updike.

Supervisors Barry Porter and Carl Faison voted against the resolution.

‘A day of rest’

“The issue to me is that I feel that it’s a day that should be reserved for activities of Christianity,” said Supervisor West, who included worship as one of them. He added that he strives to abide by such guidelines in being respectful of Sunday as a day of rest.

The pressure to shoot holes in the law comes from outside, most specifically, Richmond.

“Everybody keeps pushing these issues on us. The government is getting too big and I resent it,” he said.

West added that representatives – he named no names – too often forget where they came from once in the state capital.

“They disregard what’s good for localities,” he continued. “We have always prided ourselves on being unique and different in Southampton County. We don’t want Sunday hunting.”

Supervisor Jones also referred to his religion and upbringing.

“I support it [the resolution] because I’m a Christian – and this is me speaking on my behalf. It has nothing to do with anyone else’s religion. I was raised a Methodist and we did not do certain things on a Sunday. Now I’m a Baptist, and we don’t do those kinds of things on Sunday.

“I have a bit of land, but I don’t want nobody hunting on my land on Sunday,” Jones continued. “I have nothing against hunting. I used to hunt.”

Supervisor Phillips said he opposes Sunday hunting for different reasons. For one, he is a member of the Virginia Farm Bureau, which has gone on record as being opposed to Sunday hunting. Another is that he knows a number of the hunters, several of who will not hunt that day.

“These are my neighbors and constituents,” said Phillips.

Max Porter of Courtland, who said he’s hunted all his life, is pleased with the board’s resolution.

“The majority reflected the will of the county…it reflected the will of rural Virginians, and they’re not in favor of Sunday hunting,” said Porter.

When asked, he said he was a 30-year member of the David-Ridley Hunt Club, but no longer. Porter added other family members still belong, but he’s not been able to hunt as in the past.

“One day out of seven is set aside for people to rest and worship,” he continued. “We also need to think in terms of our naturalists, so they can enjoy the outdoors.”

Porter also thinks that Gilbert’s bill is being “pushed by urban interests and big business interests, such as big box sporting retailers.”

He thinks that there’s some “short-sightedness” on the part of legislators wanting to ease whatever restrictions exist. Once Sunday hunting is made more open, said Porter, the competition for hunting rights will increase and could have unintended consequences. For example, a full weekend of hunting could create the potential and pressure for outside interests that want to lease land for hunting. He thinks that land rents for the activity could be increased as a result.

At the same time, Porter said he recognizes the right of property owners to do as they wish.

“I certainly support the right of the landowner. I have to respect private property,” he said.

Joining in support of the resolution against hunting on Sunday is Joe Jordan of Franklin.

“I’m opposed to it. I think everyone and everything should be given a day of rest,” he said. Jordan added that he hunts as an individual, but he only goes after turkeys in the spring and fall.

Safety is another concern he has on why hunting on Sundays shouldn’t be permitted, and it extends to people who don’t hunt, but prefer to walk or ride through woods. Jordan thinks they should be able to do so without fear of accidentally being shot and killed.

Logic in question

In contrast to the majority vote, Supervisor Barry Porter is not so much in disagreement with his colleagues, as he’s concerned about individual rights.

“Neither one of us [referring to Supervisor Carl Faison] endorses hunting on Sunday. We would ourselves not hunt on Sunday. But we didn’t feel comfortable denying non-Christian people,” he said.

“I’m a Christian, but I’m not going to force my religion or Christian values on someone else. I believe Mr. Faison was very similar.

“I’ve been known to hunt occasionally, but not recently. I’m from a hunting family.”

In response to a request for comment by The Tidewater News, Supervisor Faison emailed the following statement [remarks in boldface are his, for emphasis]:

“Please understand that I am not an advocate for hunting on Sunday. Sunday is a day of worship for me. This is because of my faith. I recognize that not everyone shares my faith. Already, people fish, shop, work, watch football and do many things on Sunday. These things do not interfere with Sunday worship for those us who worship on Sunday. If hunting on Sunday were allowed in Southampton County, I expect anyone who chooses to hunt to have the respect for those of us who worship on Sunday to hunt in such a way that it does not interfere with worship. Also, I would want hunting on Sunday to be regulated so that it would not interfere with worship. I believe that this can be done in such a way that the rights and privileges of everyone can be recognized. Again, I emphasize that I am not an advocate for hunting on Sunday.”

A county resident who questions the logic of refraining from hunting on Sunday is Teresa Preston of Ivor. She’s familiar with the bill, which she mentioned didn’t make it out of a committee last year.

“The first issue is the Sabbath, and that not everyone celebrates it on a Sunday,” said Preston. “If we want to be politically correct, that other people who have recognized religions of the non-Christian variety, celebrate their Sabbath on days other than Sunday. In essence we have hunting on their Sabbath, such as Friday or Saturday.”

Another issue is the rights of landowners.

“Basically, it’s a landowner’s prerogative. They still have right to ban it on Sunday on their own property,” Preston said. “With these two [points] I presented to the committee and pointed out our country’s supposed to be about freedoms.”

She added that if people want traditions such as hunting to be available for the next generation, then opportunities should be made available. Preston said that is what she does on her land and never has charged for it, contrary to accusations she’s heard.

“When I allow people to hunt on my farm, I give preference to the military and those adults training their young people, who have taken hunter-training course and are properly licensed,” said Preston

Another reason she favors allowing hunting on Sundays is time.

Preston noted that adults’ schedules often don’t allow for hunting on weekdays, and sometimes it can come to just “one day a week if we’re lucky. But if parent isn’t free that day, then the children can’t go in the field.”

She also wonders about why hunting is singled out, but not other activities.

“If we have other sports we can do on Sunday, why is it that we have to limit this one sport? I don’t see a reason; it’s not a safety issue. If you own property and it’s up to the landowner, ‘Yes you may or may not. Period.’ Sunday would not be excluded.

“We golf on Sunday, we fish on Sunday. I don’t know of any other sport banned on Sunday. If it was truly connected with Christian beliefs, we wouldn’t fish on Sundays.”

House Bill No. 1237 and Senate Bill 154 are identical in their language. You can read each in their entirety at www.virginiageneralassembly.gov. Type in HB1237 or SB154 in Track a 2014 Bill, located within the Search Legislation with LIS box on the home page.

  • SlimPickens

    I am 100% against Sunday hunting of any kind but that decision is a personal one. I am opposed to Sunday hunting so therefore even though it may be legal in the State, I will not hunt because of my beliefes. I am also 100% against any further intervention by our government into my personal life but I cannot tell a man who wants to hunt on his own property on Sunday that he cannot do that. I have enough respect for those who attend Church to not hunt on Sunday. The Hunt Club I belong to has talked to every landowner in our area and not the first 1 agrees with Sunday hunting. The law may have changed but the land owner who grants permission still says NO!!! What good does it do to change the law when the land owners will not allow it? The Sunday hunting crowd can crow all they want to but they will not hunt on Sunday if the land owners say no. They will probably lose permission for the other 6 days out of the week just by asking to hunt on Sunday.

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  • dkirk

    Rivermud I hope you live in SOCO. IF THE BOS seat opens that Edwards currently holds I nominate you. Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

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  • Franklin Native

    I would like to know how many people that claim they are against Sunday hunting go out to eat after church or to the grocery store. What about the people serving you or working at the stores? They don’t get Sunday off. Does that mean that we should have a bill that bans doing business of any sort on Sunday? If you “personally” don’t want to hunt on Sunday then don’t! But for those that wish to hunt with their families and on their own property they should be able to.

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  • olbones

    Does this surprise anyone? They won’t allow us to muzzle load hunt because they say its unsafe, and I believe we are the only county left in Va. that doesn’t allow it. I’m not for or against it , but I fish and hunt and don’t believe it’s right to restrict others rights if they so chose to do so. It would be nice to climb up into my bow stand on sunday afternoon on my own land. Its not about the hunting, its about having control !!!!!!!!

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  • happycamper

    This bill concerns some of the last remnants of the “Blue Laws” in Virginia. It’s pretty interesting to read about the history of blue laws around the U.S., and how they’ve been “cherry-picked” to suit the whims of a few.

    Lots of areas have (have had) blue laws concerning the sale of alcohol. Funny how it was okay in some areas to sell beer and wine, but not “hard liquor”. What’s the rationale there? In Maryland, the law said you can’t buy liquor at a store, but it’s okay to buy a drink in a restaurant. What’s the rationale there?

    In Baltimore, they used to dictate the starting times of the old Colts football games so folks would have time to go to church first. Wonder how that worked? Ya’ think they held off on tailgating until after the benediction?

    In NJ, they had blue laws against digging clams on Sunday. What???

    There have been blue laws specifically dealing with the sale of paint, lawnmowers and mirrors on Sunday. Why?

    All of this points out the arbitrary nature of blue laws in general. Hunting on Sunday is not a big deal. I have friends who live in SC. They can hunt on Sunday. I’ve not noticed the decline of folks in churches there.

    Let’s get a life, folks. Hunting on Sunday is not a big deal. Those who would like to … will. Those who oppose it … won’t!

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  • hoseman

    I was neutral on Sunday hunting. That is, until I read this article. It truly amazes me that in this day and time that an elected official would attempt to impose his will upon me simply because he opposes an issue on a personal level. This narrow-minded, archaic thinking on some of the county supervisors part is beyond comprehension. If these folks do not want to hunt on Sundays, then that is their choice. It is a free country. But why would they get up on their soap boxes and attempt to block others simply because they are opposed on a personal level.

    I see no reason why a person couldn’t go to church and hunt on Sunday if they choose to do so. Another point that has not been brought up is that the DGIF supports Sunday hunting.

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  • jeffturner

    Thank you River Mud!

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  • Superdave

    If you have no other reason to support the passing of Sunday Hunting,do it for the Southampton board of supervisors. Due too the $200 per year household waste fee they imposed last year their Religious leaders are hungry and would greatly appreciate Venison donations due too an extra day of hunting to help feed their families.

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  • RedneckGraduate

    Guys we are talking about the county that freaking gave us a garbage tax, and I don’t even use the garbage dumps, I use a dumpster where I work and that trash gets taken to suffolk. I support Sunday Hunting for the fact that people who have a 5 day work week during the season might not be able to go but one day and thats saturday, which with the short season that we already have for deer season is a waste of money to buy tags for it to maybe shoot what, one deer? I mean, sunday hunting on private property should only be decided by the land owner, not the county officials that have screwed up more times then I can count to begin with. Plus with them using religion to justify their decisions is down right as low.

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  • jeffturner

    Okay, I’m confused. I do not understand what this means “Both bills aim to amend Code of Virginia 29.1-521 in regard to hunting wild animals or birds on private property of state waters on Sundays.”
    What is private property of state waters? Is that a TN misprint? Is hunting still a no go on state property on Sunday but a go on private? according to the amendment.

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    • River Mud

      The original bill (this year) was limited only to private land and “waters of the state” (private water is only stuff like ponds) to limit the protests and flagellations of the anti-hunters who insist that they like to hike on Wildlife Management Areas on Sunday mornings in January when it’s 7 degrees outside.

      Suggest Removal

  • HANSFMIVOR

    This SoCo non-religious resident that is an avid hunter
    beleives that the creatures need a day of rest, period.
    Where I live there is daily pressure all week from the clubs that is nothing short of systematic extinction.
    As a hunter i could see where I could benefit from sunday hunting, but as a steward of the resources and a father trying to raise a child to both participate in hunting and respect the resources, i firmly belive the game animals need at least a day of rest.

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    • River Mud

      If the creatures need a day of rest, we need a Sunday ban on fishing, target practice, horse riding, mountain biking, dog walking and kayaking, all of which disturb wildlife (and definitely disturb deer!).

      The fact is, no biologist has supported the “day of rest” concept for 50+ years. Deer have no days of rest from coyotes or getting hit by Hondas. Ducks have no days of rest from foxes or bald eagles. It is a concept that makes no sense.

      Furthermore, if creatures even *did* need a day of rest, let’s make it Tuesday.

      Suggest Removal

  • fishguts

    The comments put forth by the SoCo Board are, frankly, sad. Anyone in an elected position that uses religion as a basis for laws or regulations should be removed from office immediately.

    Gentlemen, stop living in the 19th century. Your greed is obvious, your ignorance is disappointing and frightening at the same time. God help those who live in Southampton.

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  • Ol Skinny

    This is ALL so funny to me…. After moving here YEARS ago and buying my tract of land, I found out that the folks that own dogs (deer hounds) have more rights than I do! I can’t keep them off my land, I can’t kill ‘em… I can’t hunt on Sunday (after church) I can’t use a muzzel loader (on my land)Now…why did I move here? I think most of my elected officials have been bought by the “dog food companies” : ) I think I am going to lease my land to the next “out of towner” that come up here asking about it… and I don’t understand why my fellow farmers feel so obligated to allow FREE hunting on their land with these dog clubs… all too funny!Sunday Hunting…After 12:00, thats my vote!

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  • Gone Fishing

    I liked the part about standing up for land owner rights, as long as you don’t want to hunt with black powder.

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  • DR

    Unfortunately freedom of religion (for some people) means freedom to force their religion and it’s laws onto others. This presents a problem, as our form of government is secular, and not theocratic. Sabbath laws are clearly religious laws.

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  • simplifyingit

    “It’s my land, i should be able to do whatever i want on it!”; Let’s examine that statement.
    Would it be OK if you started your own brothel?
    Would it be OK if you decided to make it a toxic waste dump with no “runoff” considerations?
    I think i will build my own oval track and run night races after midnight…..my neighbors shouldn’t care…..it’s my land!
    What if i grow me a murjyuana crop??? It’s my land!!! Noone should tell me i can’t!!

    Do you see how STUPID that argument is yet???

    Guess what====== I hunt, religiously, but not hunting on sunday doesn’t bother me. We ALL need to be in church and spending time with our families on that day….Murica’s morals have fallen far enough!

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    • Iraqandback03

      Your argument doesn’t hold water. Those things that you mention are illegal activities. All Virginia citizens should be allowed to choose to participate ON YOUR OWN PROPERTY on the 7th day in an activity that is legal and safe the other 6 days of the week.

      Nobody is asking to build a brothel on a toxic waste dump while growing marijuana. Your examples are bad examples of illegal activity.

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      • SIFan

        But hunting on Sunday is illegal too! And you’re begging them to change the law just because it’s your land……..that gives my argument merit in the same situation. But a close minded person with narrow views can’t/won’t see that

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      • River Mud

        Hunting in fact, is NOT illegal in Virginia. It is permitted for a very few, very rich people. That’s why the language of this County Resolution does NOT read “ban all sunday hunting” but instead, “Keep Sunday hunting regulations as they currently are.”

        Because the current Sunday hunting ban only bans about 97% of hunters from going afield on Sunday. The rich and powerful, like members of your Board of Supervisors, get a pass on the Sunday ban. They like it that way.

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      • River Mud

        typo…”SUNDAY hunting is, in fact, not illegal in Virginia.”

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      • seymorebutts

        Iraqandback03, Sunday is the 1st day of the week. Sifan, Hunting on Sunday is illegally illegal. Meaning, unconstitutional. It’s just now more people are open minded and actually want things to be morally right & without discrimination. Therefore changes are being made in the right direction. If you stand up for blocking any American from doing something based on your religion you are discriminating against them for one of Americas founding rights. Freedom of religion was a huge deal back then and now. For 3 of our local elected officials to blatantly try to deprive that right is a clear sign they should not now, nor ever represent any Americans citizens again.

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    • River Mud

      Hunting is a constitutional right in Virginia.

      Should we be able to suspend your right to select your own religion (and not have the state select one for you) one day per week? Perhaps Palestinian Muslim on tuesday?

      No, because that’s ridiculous and unconstitutional. As is the Sunday hunting ban.

      Suggest Removal

  • FromHere

    No for Sunday Hunting. That’s the only day you can go walking without fear of bothering a hunter or being mistaken for a deer, no truck zooming, no dogs running, nobody up the tree stands if you want to walk around a field. If you work, save some vacation to hunt. If you’re able to hunt during the week, take a break on Sunday. Everybody doesn’t hunt!

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    • Iraqandback03

      You do realize this bill is private property only no deer dogs right? This bill is a compromise that answers all your complaints. Stay off my property when you walk and you will be fine. No deer dogs takes care of your other worries.

      So does that mean you support this compromise bill now?

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    • River Mud

      This bill is for private property only.

      That means if it’s your property, you can tell your hunters, “No sundays please.”

      That means if it’s MY property….wait, why are you trespassing in my fields?

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  • brucem1941

    OK, I get it. I can go to Walmart, a Nascar race, fish until I run out of bait, cut the grass, and numerous other activities but if I choose to hunt on one of my 2 days off a week, I can’t legally do it. It’s an old archaic law that needs to be changed. You pay your taxes and are not allowed to use your land(within in the established hunting seasons)as you wish. As for those who wish to exercise their religious freedom on Sunday, I say AMEN. I’ll be doing the same. But after church if I want to enjoy some of the wonders the creator has given us, then let me do that too.

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  • seymorebutts

    First off Diesel wrote nearly word for word what I was going to comment on. When I read the ending about the trash fee we just received my jaw dropped so to speak because that was going to be in my closing statement.

    In reference to Mr. Faison And Mr. Porter, THANK YOU for doing the right thing legally and morally. I do not personally know Mr. Porter but I do Know Mr. Faison fairly well and he’s a wonderful human being, a man of faith and good character. They went at this the correct way.

    In reference to the supervisors who *admitted* to voting in such a way due to your Christian beliefs, which does in fact make a bold push of your beliefs onto non-Christians such as myself… Simply put, I do not believe you will have a defense in court if this isn’t readdressed and corrected.

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  • Liberty With Responsibility

    If the state law passes allowing Sunday hunting, can’t SoCo pass a local ordinance prohibiting it? I am aware of other sitations that things allowed by the state are not allowed by SoCo. I think this IS an option, so what’s the problem?

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    • River Mud

      The resolution they passed holds no legal weight. An ordinance that passed would have to be evaluated by County lawyers for legal sufficiency (trust me, the Resolution- same one drafted up by VAHDA for use in EVERY COUNTY would not pass any legal sniff test). If sufficient, it’s likely that it would have to go to ballot/referendum. If it did pass by majority vote – unlikely since it would have to be worded something like “ordinance allowing County BOS the legal ability to prohibit otherwise legal activities in the state, on private land, on days selected by the BOS” – then only the COUNTY SHERIFF would be able to enforce. That’s right, the game wardens would not show up to enforce a County law. The only way that State Police, Marine Police, State Park/Forest Rangers or Game Wardens would enforce the law is if the County BOS asked VDGIF to be exempted from Sunday hunting, and VDGIF agreed. Problem is – VDGIF would deny that request.

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      • Liberty With Responsibility

        You’re messing up my question: It is obvious that state law allows black powder deer hunting. SoCo has chosen to prohibit it, right? That’s the same thing as if the state allows Sunday hunting. If the county wants to, it can prohibit it within SoCo. Is the Sherrif the only one that can enforce the “no black-powder hunting” rule?

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    • gs

      Conservation officers only enforce state laws and will nottake calls on muzzleloading

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    • seymorebutts

      LibertyWithResponsibility, yes they could create a law but it would clearly be in violation of the citizens rights being passed in retaliation of the Commonwealth’s decision due to their religious beliefs (as admitted by themselves). It would certainly gain some media attention outside of the local bubble which is possibly what they are after… As I said earlier “Simply put, I do not believe they will have a defense in court”

      Suggest Removal

  • DIESEL

    To the supervisors that created this resolution,

    Do you fail to understand the principle of separation of church and state? If you are a christian and choose not to hunt on Sunday…that is your choice. But if I’m not a christian and want to hunt on my property on Sunday, what makes you feel so important that you can force your religious views into my life? Don’t want your land used that way? Don’t allow it. If I choose to use my land that way…mind your own business. The argument against hunting on Sunday doesn’t hold even a drop of water.
    Supervisors, you have much more pressing issues to deal with in this county. How about finding a way to reduce/remove the trash fee I just got in the mail…which is darn near robbery. Put more effort into bringing in some businesses to boost our local economy. I could go on but my fingers are tired.

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    • chilimac72

      Though I agree completely with your statement, and I do believe you can hunt on Sunday and still be a Christian, the use of “separation of church and state” is inaccurate. There is no legal grounds that calls for it. It is not in the Constitution and there is no requirement to keep them separate.

      Historical reference

      Those discussions—recorded in the Congressional Records from June 7 through September 25 of 1789—make clear their intent for the First Amendment. By it, the Founders were saying: “We do not want in America what we had in Great Britain: we don’t want one denomination running the nation. We will not all be Catholics, or Anglicans, or any other single denomination. We do want God’s principles, but we don’t want one denomination running the nation.”

      This intent was well understood, as evidenced by court rulings after the First Amendment. For example, a 1799 court declared:

      “By our form of government, the Christian religion is the established religion; and all sects and denominations of Christians are placed on the same equal footing.”

      Again, note the emphasis: “We do want Christian principles—we do want God’s principles—but we don’t want one denomination to run the nation.”

      http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/987191/posts

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      • seymorebutts

        Ever read the 14th amendment chilimac72? Go read it. I really dislike when religious people write long elaborate uneducated incorrect comments. Maybe you will come back and recant your comment :)

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      • River Mud

        You contradict yourself. The Supreme Court of the United States has held repeatedly that “Sunday bans” do in fact “establish a state religion” because those who choose to worship on a different day are discriminated upon. The Blue Laws have all fallen based on the “Establishment Clause.” Any landowner who filed a lawsuit against the County for religious discrimination would win, if the County ever tried to pass a real ordinance banning Sunday hunting.

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      • DIESEL

        chilimac…I also suggest you read from the beginning. Try the 1st Amendment. You know, the part that says “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof”. Prohibiting hunting on Sunday on a religious basis violates this diectly. Thank you for participating in the discussion. Here endeth the lesson.

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      • BlondeStranger

        Interesting, chilimac. What I find even more interesting, though, is that President John Adams, who was a devout Christian, presented the Treaty of Tripoli to the US Senate in June of 1797. It was passed unanimously, and subsequently signed by Adams himself. It contains the following language:

        “As the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion,…”

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      • chilimac72

        I am humored by the fact that you refer to me as religious. I in no way consider myself religious, let alone Christian. My point was that there is nothing in the Constitution that establishes that states “separation of church and state” and that anyone believing so actually missed what the intention was, which was to establish any Christian faith as the priority. I believe that the only valid argument against hunting on Sunday is that which was already made, to provide one day a week when it is safe to walk in the woods without getting shot.

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      • chilimac72

        Treaty of Tripoli… intended to ensure there was no “holy war” being established as the nation denounced pirates not Muslims. Reaching…

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      • BlondeStranger

        Reaching? Not even a little. I’m merely stating a fact.

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  • ROBERT GREEN

    If you own the land you should be able to hunt on YOUR land on any day of the week during hunting season. It is just another case of the Big Government oppressing the people. The people, the taxpayers that pay For all the crap that goes on in Washington. How about no Food stamp cards can be used on Sundays? I cant feed myself through hunting on Sunday then my tax money should not be spent on those that don’t want to work.

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    • River Mud

      What’s funny/sad is that the Southampton BOS has drank the koolaid of the VAHDA and Farm Bureau, that somehow repealing the Sunday hunting ban (i.e. taking AWAY a state law) is “BIG STATE GOVERNMENT FORCING ITS LAWS DOWN OUR THROATS.”

      I’ve asked several folks to explain to me how striking out an unconstitutional state law is “forcing big government” down anyone’s throat. What a joke!

      Suggest Removal

  • RWH

    Yes for Sunday hunting.

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  • Iraqandback03

    This is an excellent compromise private property rights bill that also excludes deer hounds use on Sunday, at the request of the hound hunting community leadership.

    You would think the bill the is passing with overwhelming support throughout the state said “You must hunt on Sunday.” It doesn’t, it in fact it gives the power to the citizens of Southampton County to decide for themselves what happens on their own private property. Is it possible what these big Government control types don’t like? Don’t you hear yourself and the argument you are making?

    This is an excellent compromise bill. I thought the Virginia Farm Bureau was there to fight FOR private property rights.

    There are so many holes in the arguments above that I could squeeze a tractor trailer through them.

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    • River Mud

      These state Republicans sure love “private property rights.”

      Meaning – THEIR right to control YOUR private property.”

      Suggest Removal

      • gs

        Better than socialistic democrats who want more of your money.

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      • River Mud

        Better? I don’t know. The Democrats advertise that they are coming for your money. The Republicans in this state promise they are on the side of the little man and then yuk it up with their billionaire buddies as they’re taking you to the cleaners and keeping your constitutional rights for themselves. Then when they get caught, it’s basically, “Hey whippersnapper, you better get to church, Jesus told you not to judge your neighbor, now GIT! so I can count up my money.”

        So, I’d say they are about the same.

        Suggest Removal

      • gs

        River mud, I agree, thank you.

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